Regions
The IATC has always been more than a hiking club.  From its earliest days in the 1970's, the club has been a voice for the protection of not only trails but the wildlands through which they run. The IATC has achieved massive victories with the creation of Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park and Tiger Mountain State Forest and the many fold expansion of Squak Mountain State Park.

The advocacy work of the club is ongoing, and takes many forms:
  • Protecting public open space and parks from improper use and the impacts of nearby development
  • Negotiating and working with developers to secure trails and open space within their projects
  • Working with public agencies and private landowners to secure more acreage for the parklands in and around the Issaquah Alps
The club has official appointed advocates for each region in and around the Issaquah Alps, but your help and voices are often needed to back them up!  The more people who speak up for the protection of trails and open space, the stronger and more effective our collective voice will be.

Cougar Mountain

Advocate:  Steve Williams  425-453-8997

Site of 3,082 acre Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park.

Cougar Mountain Info

Cougar Map

Lankow Trailhead: George and Carla Lankow's gift to the public of a pedestrian easement and parking area on their property connecting directly to the Licorice Fern/Far Country Trail and Cougar Mt. Park has been officially recorded. It is good to hike the Licorice Fern Trail knowing it's a done deal, and seeing all the recent official signage go up. Thanks to Scott Semans and his trailworkers and to the official County crew for all the work on this trail.

East Village: development update - This development is now known as Talus. The documentation and planning stage is largely over, with generally favorable results for trails. Connections should emerge between the development and the Precipice and Shangri La Trails, along with signage directing hikers between them. However, we all need to be watching in the field to see what materializes. Keep me posted.

The Precipice: The club is continuing to advocate for the protection of the Precipice area NE of Cougar Mt. Park, ideally for inclusion within the Park boundaries. In 2001, the Trails Club surveyed the Precipice trail system 3 times by GPS, and this data has been added to King County's database, a good step. Guide to Trails of Cougar Mountain, 2000 edition - This completely updated version of Harvey Manning and Ralph Owen's classic and authoritative guidebook (last revised in 1991) is now available from the Issaquah Alps Trails Club and is also available from REI. All of the trails of the Wildland Park, plus Bellevue and Newcastle trails on the north and west sides of the mountain, plus a host of other trails along the Park periphery, are featured. Author Charles McCrone (who redid the 1999 Trails Club Cougar map) has done 2 years of fresh research and revision on all the original trail descriptions, taking into account reroutes, changes from development, and all the new maps of the Park. The guidebook is an excellent way to learn the history behind the Park and the evolution of its trails, and to get involved in the life of America's largest urban wildland. The 2000 edition also features an all new foreword by Harvey Manning, chronicling the amazing story of how this land was saved in the 1980s to become Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park.

Newcastle Trails Club is our new partner on the Cougar scene, pushing for trails and open space on the west side of the mountain. One of their current projects is establishing a permanent connection to the Park along the De Leo Wall from Newcastle. They could use our help, so consider joining their club or going out.

Newcastle Trails Map


Grand Ridge

Advocate:  David Kappler 425-652-2753

Grand Ridge County Park extends from I-90 to the Old Issaquah-Fall City Road.  It is open to hikers, bikers, and equestrians.

Grand Ridge Park Information

Trail Map

GRAND RIDGE (including MITCHELL HILL and PRESTON RIDGE) is the undeveloped area ranging south to I-90, west to the Issaquah Highlands, East to the Raging River, and north to the Snoqualmie River Valley.  Issues on Grand Ridge are dominated by the results of the 1990's decisions to proceed with the "Issaquah Highlands" development under terms of a "4 to 1 agreement" that provided four acres of King County park land for every one acre allowed for urban development. The result of this agreement is that 3,250 new homes are now under construction on Grand Ridge as the "Issaquah Highlands," a large new interchange and Sammamish plateau access road are under construction at Sunset interchange (Exit 18) on I-90, and approximately 1,400 acres of land was donated as park land as part of the agreement. Combined with Duthie Hill Park and Fall City Park, this acreage totals approximately 1,700-acres in King County Parks ownership. These lands currently have numerous trails running through them, many of which will be destroyed or cut short by the planned development, and all of which have become a favorite playground for mountain bikers.

King County Parks is intending to begin a Master Planning Process for these parklands to determine how they will be managed, what trails will remain open, what trails are needed, and which users will have access to various trails.

In addition to these 1,700 acres, the recent successful acquisition of the Grand Ridge-Mitchell Hill Connector parcels (475 acres) provides an east-west forested connection between the Grand Ridge Park lands to over 1,000 acres of State DNR forestland above Preston, creating a total public land acreage of over 3,000 acres between Grand Ridge and Preston.

Key Advocacy Issues/Challenges:

  • Strongly advocate for proper management and use of public lands and the trail system on Grand Ridge as the master planning process begins by King County Parks
  • Carefully watchdog/monitor environmental impacts from the massive development and road projects now underway. 

Raging River State Forest includes the area east of SR 18, south of I-90, west of Rattlesnake Mountain and north of Taylor Mountain.  This newly acquired 10,441 acre state forest will offer a variety of recreational opportunities that are in the planning stage at this time.  The property has had numerous owners over time and now with a single owner both timber management and recreation can be well planned.

Description - Advocacy responsibilities for the Raging River and Preston encompass the headwaters of the Raging River between Rattlesnake and Taylor Mountains, the Raging River basin lying SE of the I-90/Hwy 18 interchange, areas surrounding Preston to the north, east, and west, and the open space initiatives undertaken by the Preston Community Club in their "Forest Gateway Vision" document.

With completion of the new, 4-lane Snoqualmie Ridge Parkway facilitating the new Snoqualmie Ridge development (2,000 homes) just to the north of the I-90/Hwy 18 interchange (Exit 25), it's clear that the future of the entire Raging River valley lying just across the freeway to south is at high risk for conversion to development. While currently zoned "Forest Production," (meaning the zoning intent is for long term forest management on the land), ownership of approximately 1,500 acres in the basin has nonetheless already been passed to the Weyerhaeuser Real Estate Division for future development planning.

The entire Raging River basin is currently in a forested state and provides a critical open space linkage between the Cedar River Watershed, Rattlesnake Mountain, Taylor Mountain, and Tiger Mountain. Any development in the basin would fragment the forest and seriously and permanently impact the natural ecosystem, including the fragile Raging River itself (one of the last, best salmon streams remaining in King County). In 1998, Weyerhaeuser sold over 8,000 acres in the Raging River basin to Sunkist Grower's, which states an intent to continue to manage these lands for timber production, not development. However, the 1,500 acres nearest Hwy 18 and I-90 is owned by Weyerhaeuser Real Estate division, which is exploring development options.

In Preston, an active Preston Community Club identified several initiatives in a document called, "the Forest Gateway Vision," that were intended to preserve the rural, forested character of the Preston area in the face of escalating development pressures. With the solid backing of King County Executive Ron Sims and the County Council, King County has moved aggressively to successfully accomplish each of the elements of the Vision, including:

  • Purchasing the 22-acre Preston Mill Site for use as a future County Park and environmental education center.
  • Purchasing a 20-acre site doomed for industrial warehouses to instead become the future Preston Arboretum and Botanical Gardens. Almost 300 additional acres are being purchased for additional arboretum lands and to protect the forested edge of I-90 from becoming a strip city of development.
  • Purchasing land for the Preston Park Ballfields. 15 acres were purchased which, rather than becoming additional commercial development, will instead become ballfields for local youth.
  • Completing the first-ever Transfer of Development Credits (TDC) project on a 313-acre forested parcel slated for development. Instead, this and a second parcel will serve as the Grand Ridge-Mitchell Hill Connector, providing a 475-acre forested linkage between 1,700 acres of County park land on Grand Ridge eastward to over 1,000 acres of State DNR forestland on Mitchell Hill, above Preston. This connection will support wildlife migration and future trail linkages.

Key Advocacy Issues/Challenges:

  • Advocate strongly for the permanent conservation of forest lands in the Raging River basin and the north slope of Taylor Mountain, even if these lands remain in private ownership as "working forests," i.e., oppose any proposal for development south of I-90 and in the Raging basin.

Issaquah

Advocate:  Connie Marsh 425-392-4908

Issaquah includes the main portion of the City of Issaquah, the Eastern side of Cougar Mountain (Talus), the Northern slopes of Squak Mountain (Squak Mountain Loop), the Western toes of Tiger Mountain (Park Point), the South Western slopes of Grand Ridge (Issaquah Highlands), the Southern side of the Sammamish Plateau, and Lake Sammamish State Park.

Lower West Tiger (Park Pointe):  The City of Issaquah now owns 104 acres of protected open space on lower western Tiger Mountain.  A plan has been created to improve the trails and attempt to mingle mountain bike access with hiking.  A new trail head has been created on Sunset Way at the base of Exit 18 on the south side of I-90.  This new trail head provides easy access to the High Point Trail, on the west side of I-90 and a place to park and begin your bike ride or hike up to Tiger Mountain.  

Squak Mountain:  No particular changes.

Lake Sammamish State Park:  The State Park is creating a boardwalk to allow walking out to the “spit” of the park without being buried in mud!  It should be done by fall of 2013.

Lake Sammamish State Park Map

Issaquah Highlands:  There is an increasing series of trails and linkages in the Issaquah Highlands.  The newest is a trail linking Central Park to a housing development near Falls Drive.  There is increased access to the Grand Ridge Trails from the BPA corridor that goes through Central Park.

Issaquah Highlands Urban Style Trails Map

Issaquah Highlands Parks & Trails Map

Talus:  No particular changes.

Talus Map

Southern side of the Sammamish Plateau:  See the Issaquah Highlands map above.


Preston

Advocate:  David Kappler 425-652-2753

Preston includes the main portion of the Town of Preston, The Upper Preston Community, and the developed portion of the South Eastern side of Mitchell Hill.

Key Advocacy Issues/Challenges:

  • Support continuing efforts to realize the Forest Gateway Vision, i.e., support master planning by King County Parks for the Preston initiatives, and support efforts to secure funding for development of needed park amenities.

Advocate:  David Kappler 425-652-2753

Raging River State Forest includes the area east of SR 18, south of I-90, west of Rattlesnake Mountain and north of Taylor Mountain.  This newly acquired 10,441 acre state forest will offer a variety of recreational opportunities that are in the planning stage at this time.  The property has had numerous owners over time and now with a single owner both timber management and recreation can be well planned.

Description - Advocacy responsibilities for the Raging River and Preston encompass the headwaters of the Raging River between Rattlesnake and Taylor Mountains, the Raging River basin lying SE of the I-90/Hwy 18 interchange, areas surrounding Preston to the north, east, and west, and the open space initiatives undertaken by the Preston Community Club in their "Forest Gateway Vision" document.

With completion of the new, 4-lane Snoqualmie Ridge Parkway facilitating the new Snoqualmie Ridge development (2,000 homes) just to the north of the I-90/Hwy 18 interchange (Exit 25), it's clear that the future of the entire Raging River valley lying just across the freeway to south is at high risk for conversion to development. While currently zoned "Forest Production," (meaning the zoning intent is for long term forest management on the land), ownership of approximately 1,500 acres in the basin has nonetheless already been passed to the Weyerhaeuser Real Estate Division for future development planning.

The entire Raging River basin is currently in a forested state and provides a critical open space linkage between the Cedar River Watershed, Rattlesnake Mountain, Taylor Mountain, and Tiger Mountain. Any development in the basin would fragment the forest and seriously and permanently impact the natural ecosystem, including the fragile Raging River itself (one of the last, best salmon streams remaining in King County). In 1998, Weyerhaeuser sold over 8,000 acres in the Raging River basin to Sunkist Grower's, which states an intent to continue to manage these lands for timber production, not development. However, the 1,500 acres nearest Hwy 18 and I-90 is owned by Weyerhaeuser Real Estate division, which is exploring development options.

In Preston, an active Preston Community Club identified several initiatives in a document called, "the Forest Gateway Vision," that were intended to preserve the rural, forested character of the Preston area in the face of escalating development pressures. With the solid backing of King County Executive Ron Sims and the County Council, King County has moved aggressively to successfully accomplish each of the elements of the Vision, including:

  • Purchasing the 22-acre Preston Mill Site for use as a future County Park and environmental education center.
  • Purchasing a 20-acre site doomed for industrial warehouses to instead become the future Preston Arboretum and Botanical Gardens. Almost 300 additional acres are being purchased for additional arboretum lands and to protect the forested edge of I-90 from becoming a strip city of development.
  • Purchasing land for the Preston Park Ballfields. 15 acres were purchased which, rather than becoming additional commercial development, will instead become ballfields for local youth.
  • Completing the first-ever Transfer of Development Credits (TDC) project on a 313-acre forested parcel slated for development. Instead, this and a second parcel will serve as the Grand Ridge-Mitchell Hill Connector, providing a 475-acre forested linkage between 1,700 acres of County park land on Grand Ridge eastward to over 1,000 acres of State DNR forestland on Mitchell Hill, above Preston. This connection will support wildlife migration and future trail linkages.

Key Advocacy Issues/Challenges:

  • Advocate strongly for the permanent conservation of forest lands in the Raging River basin and the north slope of Taylor Mountain, even if these lands remain in private ownership as "working forests," i.e., oppose any proposal for development south of I-90 and in the Raging basin.

Raging River Basin

Advocate:  David Kappler 425-652-2753

Raging River State Forest includes the area east of SR 18, south of I-90, west of Rattlesnake Mountain and north of Taylor Mountain.  This newly acquired 10,441 acre state forest will offer a variety of recreational opportunities that are in the planning stage at this time.  The property has had numerous owners over time and now with a single owner both timber management and recreation can be well planned.

Raging River State Forest Logging Roads Map

Description - Advocacy responsibilities for the Raging River encompass the headwaters of the Raging River between Tiger, Rattlesnake, and Taylor Mountains, the Raging River basin, lying SE of the I-90/Hwy 18 interchange.

With completion of the new, 4-lane Snoqualmie Ridge Parkway facilitating the new Snoqualmie Ridge development (2,000 homes) just to the north of the I-90/Hwy 18 interchange (Exit 25), it's clear that the future of the entire Raging River valley lying just across the freeway to south is at high risk for conversion to development. While currently zoned "Forest Production," (meaning the zoning intent is for long term forest management on the land), ownership of approximately 1,500 acres in the basin has nonetheless already been passed to the Weyerhaeuser Real Estate Division for future development planning.

The entire Raging River basin is currently in a forested state and provides a critical open space linkage between the Cedar River Watershed, Rattlesnake Mountain, Taylor Mountain, and Tiger Mountain. Any development in the basin would fragment the forest and seriously and permanently impact the natural ecosystem, including the fragile Raging River itself (one of the last, best salmon streams remaining in King County). In 1998, Weyerhaeuser sold over 8,000 acres in the Raging River basin to Sunkist Grower's, which states an intent to continue to manage these lands for timber production, not development. However, the 1,500 acres nearest Hwy 18 and I-90 is owned by Weyerhaeuser Real Estate division, which is exploring development options.

Key Advocacy Issues/Challenges:

  • Advocate strongly for the permanent conservation of forest lands in the Raging River asin and the north slope of Taylor Mountain.

Rattlesnake Ridge

Advocate:  David Kappler 425-652-2753

Rattlesnake Mountain Scenic Area contains 1,836 acres across the Snoqualmie Valley from Mount Si on the south side of I-90.  Best known for the Ledges most often reached from the Rattlesnake Trailhead in the Cedar River Watershed property, but not in the actual Cedar River watershed.

Description: Rattlesnake and Taylor Mountains lie east of Tiger Mountain and Hwy 18, and south of I-90, with Rattlesnake on the north side of the Raging River and Taylor on the south. Efforts since 1993 by King County Parks, Washington State Dept. of Natural Resources (DNR), and the Forest Service have led to the acquisition of over 3,000 acres of public land on Rattlesnake and 1,700 acres on Taylor. Most of the land on the south slope of Rattlesnake and the north slope of Taylor is still in private, timber company ownership including Weyerhaeuser, Sunkist Growers, and Trillium.

On Rattlesnake, the public ownership lies almost exclusively on the northward (facing I-90) side of the mountain and covers the area from the old Snoqualmie Winery site (I-90 Exit 27) across the face of the mountain, generally above the powerline corridor, eastward to Rattlesnake Lake. The first large acquisition occurred in 1993, when DNR and King County combined funds to purchase 1,800 acres at a generously discounted price from Weyerhaeuser. This acreage was designated the "Rattlesnake Mountain Scenic Management Area," and is managed as a "Natural Resources Conservation Area (NRCA)" by DNR. This means that no timber harvests are allowed and protection of the ecological and natural resource values are top priority, with recreation a secondary priority.

An additional 1,100 acres at the western end of the "Scenic Area" was purchased in 1997 as "working forestlands" using combined federal Forest Legacy and King County funding. Some parcels of land are owned by the Forest Service, but the majority of these lands are managed by DNR on behalf of the County as "trust lands," producing income for the county from timber harvests.

In early 2000, a critical 130-acre parcel, called Snoqualmie Point, was purchased by the Forest Service from owners that had planned to locate a large new office park on the former Snoqualmie Winery site, one of the most spectacular viewpoints in King County. Instead, 10-acres of this site (the open area of the former Winery and entertainment amphitheater) will be managed by the City of Snoqualmie as a public park, scenic viewpoint, and event amphitheater, while the remaining 120 acres will be managed by the Forest Service as public forestland.

The Rattlesnake Mountain Trail (RMT), an enjoyable 11.3 mile long, cross-Rattlesnake trail from Rattlesnake Lake to Snoqualmie Point was officially established and signed in 1998 via a joint effort by DNR, King County, IATC, MTS Greenway, and WA Trails Association. The eastern portion of the trail starts on City of Seattle Water Dept property at Rattlesnake Lake and climbs 1.3 miles to dramatic rock outcroppings (Rattlesnake Ledges) that offer spectacular views. The Seattle Water Dept. allowed IATC volunteers to construct this trail as the first public trail use allowed on watershed property. Along the RMT, as well as from the distance, several communications towers are located at the high points of the ridgeline.

Led by IATC member Harry Morgan, enormous efforts and years-long battles led to a settlement in which King County Parks purchased the 1,700-acre Manke parcel, which is now called "Taylor Mountain Forest." This park lies on the south-facing slope of Taylor, while the entire north facing slope remains in private ownership. Master planning is underway by King County Parks to determine how Taylor Mountain Forest will be managed and what uses will be allowed.

Key Advocacy Issues/Challenges:

  • Ensure future management plans for Taylor Mountain Forest are compatible with a rural, forested area, with the environmental limitations existing on the property, and with IATC goals for the land and its trail systems.
  • Support acquisition of key private holdings bordering existing public ownership on Rattlesnake Mountain and of key inholdings within Taylor Mountain Forest.
  • Support creation of a Rattlesnake to Landsburg trail connection that would connect to Tiger Mountain trails.
  • Monitor WSDOT planning for improvements to Hwy 18 to ensure that wildlife crossing considerations are addressed and impacts to surrounding forestlands are minimized.

Middle Fork of the Snoqualmie River

Advocate:  George Potter  425-557-6554

This includes the 12,676 acre Natural Resource Conservation Area for Little Si and Si, the Middle Fork Forest with 2,561, and the Middle Fork Natural Resource Conservation Area with 8,962 acres.


South Fork of the Snoqualmie River

Advocate:  Dave Kappler  425-652-2753

This includes the I-90 Corridor from Twin Falls through Snoqualmie Pass.


Squak Mountain

Advocate:  Cathy Brandt  425-430-9877

Squak Mountain is located between Cougar to the west and Tiger to the east.  It is home to 1545 acre Squak Mountain State Park and several hundred acres of protected open space belonging to King County and the City of Issaquah.

State Park Site for Squak

Squak Map

Description - Over 2,500 acres of public lands lie on Squak Mountain, including Squak Mountain State Park (1,570 acres) and approximately 1,000 acres owned by King County Parks. These lands cover the upper, forested portion of the mountain as well as a forested corridor on both the west and east sides that connect these public lands to other public holdings on both Cougar and Tiger Mountains.

Public ownership on Squak was initiated by a generous 590-acre donation by the Bullitt family to State Parks, on the condition that this parkland be managed for low impact, non-mechanized recreation, i.e., no motors, chainsaws, bikes, or other mechanical objects can be used. In 1994, State Parks more than doubled the size of the park when it acquired Section 9, on the south half of the mountain. King County Parks also contibuted significantly by a series of purchases of land on the east and west sides of Squak that abut the State Parks boundaries. The most recent purchase is the old Sunset Quarry at the crest of SR900 between Squak and Cougar. 120 of the 170 acre site have been acquired by King County, with the remainder to be purchased upon restoration. It's intended that this will become a future trailhead for both Squak and Cougar mountains. There is no logging on Squak since the entire public ownership is in "park" status. State Parks has made ongoing efforts to improve park access with a new trailhead off May Valley Road, and with new trails and trail connections throughout the park. Similarly, King County Parks has contributed new trails and bridges on their ownership on Squak. Most recently, after ten years of planning and efforts by IATC and the City of Issaquah, a cooperative effort between State Parks, King County Parks, IATC, Washington Trails Association, Earthcorps (formerly Cascadia Quest), the City of Issaquah, and Mountains to Sound Greenway Trust, led to the completion of a new Squak Mountain Access Trail/East Ridge Trail, with a separate connector trail to East Side Trail. These trails provide a much desired pedestrian linkage between downtown Issaquah and public lands on Squak.

Recently, IATC also led efforts to oppose the siting of a new million-gallon water reservoir on a portion of King County Park lands on Squak Mountain. The proposed site would have required intrusion of a new road into a beautifully forested portion of the mountain near the junction of East Ridge Trail and the new Squak Mountain Access Trail, as well as clearing of almost two acres and construction of large retaining walls and a water tank structure. As a result of IATC and other citizen's opposition, subsequent evaluations found a safer, cheaper location for this site within the City of Issaquah. This is a good example of how IATC must vigilantly watch over and protect our public lands from the seemingly regular threats of water tanks, powerlines, gas lines, new roads, or other public facilities.


Taylor Mountain

Advocate:  Ralph Owen 425-270-3322

Taylor Mountain includes King County's Taylor Mountain Forest, parts of the Cedar River Watershed open to the public and parts of the Washington State Raging River State Forest.  The county forest includes 1822 acres and is open to hiking, biking and equestrian users.  The primary user is the equestrian community.  It is important to remember that this land is identified as a "forest" and not a "park"  and active forestry occurs on a regular basis.

Taylor Forest Information

Taylor Forest Map


Tiger Mountain

Advocate:  Ed Vervoort  206-523-6461

Tradition Plateau Map

Tiger Mountain contains the West Tiger Natural Resources Conservation Area (NRCA) on the highly visible NW side of the mountain and some small NRCA areas all together totaling 3885 acres. Tiger Mountain State Forest contains 9,549 acres.  Tiger has many miles of trails and two large trailheads, one at High Point on I-90 at Exit 20 and one at the Tiger Summit on State Route 18.

Public lands on Tiger Mountain include Tiger Mountain State Forest and the City of Issaquah's Tradition Plateau Natural Resources Conservation Area; a total of over 14,000 acres of forested land which includes almost 70 miles of year-around hiking trails. The entire acreage is managed by Washington State Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Within the total 14,000 acres, 4,400 acres on the NW side of Tiger are managed as the "West Tiger Mountain Natural Resources Conservation Area," meaning that no logging occurs and the primary objective for these lands is to preserve and protect their ecological functions and integrity, with human recreational use a secondary goal. The remaining acreage is "trust lands," managed by DNR on behalf of the "trust beneficiaries" (schools, universities, King County, etc.) to produce income primarily through timber harvests, but also from TV and radio towers located on Tiger.

Tiger Mountain State Forest was created with IATC support as an "experimental working forest in an urban environment." The goal was, and still remains, to prove that forestlands CAN be productively managed for multiple public benefits (recreation, wildlife and fish habitat, scenic values, water and air quality, and timber production) even on the fringe of the most dense urban area in Washington state. With DNR's cooperation, IATC members have been involved from the beginnings of Tiger Mountain State Forest in the planning for and management of these public lands, its trails, timber operations, and other issues. Many people mistakenly believe Tiger Mountain to be a "park." It is not, rather it is a "working forest" that, under DNR's management and IATC's watchful eye, provides an extraordinary example of the many benefits that a "working forest" can provide.

Key Advocacy Issues/Challenges:

  • Support acquisition of private holdings critical to the protection of the Natural Resources Conservation area (NRCA) as well as the Working Forest Area.
  • Carefully monitor and manage public use and activities so that they don't negatively impact the ecological values or natural resources in high use areas; i.e., as public use levels grow even more, ensure that Tiger Mountain isn't "loved to death" by too many people. Support a "no new trails" policy on Tiger; i.e., unauthorized trail building without specific DNR approval will not be tolerated by IATC.
  • Monitor plans for the proposed SE Bypass, new Sunset interchange, and proposed Park Pointe development, and actively advocate for the careful protection of Tiger Mountain and the Natural Resources Conservation Area.